“The Grand Budapest Hotel” Review

KELSEY PHARSIS//KATIE PICKRELL

“The Grand Budapest Hotel,” written and directed by Wes Anderson, is by far the most impressive movie of the year thus far.

As the movie opens, a woman is walking through a cemetery. When she sits down, she is at the grave of “Author.” It is then that she picks up the book and begins reading; as she reads, the movie truly begins.

The tale lasts for over 50 years, stretching from the 1930s until the 1980s. The story follows a man named Zero, played by many people, but first by Tony Revolori, who working at the hotel ran by M. Gustave, played by Ralph Fiennes. Soon, the two become best friends through a series of complex events.

Budapest

Zero falls in love with a pastry girl, Agatha, played by Saoirse Ronan. She later helps break Gustave out of jail after he is incriminated for murdering one of his girlfriends.

The whole movie turns into a murder-mystery mixed in with thievery, complete with remarkable getaways.

The production of the movie was extremely colorful and upbeat. The film was constantly intriguing the audience in an amusing way.

Accompanying the production was the actors and actresses. The film was overflowing with a well known cast, from Murray Abraham to Harvey Keitel. Every character played their part perfectly, making the movie even greater than it already was.

“Budapest” is a movie that is more than worth the trip to the theater. It definitely deserves a five-of-five rating. It is a film that I know I’ll be spending another ten dollars on to see again.

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